UBC Cinnamon Bun Recipe 1989

UBC Cinnamon Bun Recipe 1989
dieting tips for college students
Image by Gord McKenna
UBC Cinnamon buns: at last, the secret is out (From the Vancouver Sun)

Rolls:
3 cups (750ml) milk
6 tablespoons (90ml) margarine
6 tablespoons (90ml) sugar
1 tablespoon (15ml) salt
1 teaspoon (5ml) sugar
½ cup (125ml) warm water
2 envelopes active dry yeast
2 large eggs
9 cups (2250ml) all-purpose flour, about

Filling:
¾ cup (175 ml) melted margarine, divided
1 ¼ cups (300mL) sugar
2 tablespoons (30ml) cinnamon

For rolls, scald milk. Stir in margarine, the six tablespoons sugar and salt. Cool to lukewarm.
Dissolve the one teaspoon sugar in warm water. Sprinkle yeast over water mixture. Let stand in warm place for 10 minutes. Stir.
In large mixing bowl, combine lukewarm milk mixture and eggs. Stir in dissolved yeast Add four to five cups of the flour and beat well for 10 minutes. With wooden spoon gradually add enough of the remaining flour to make a soft dough. Turn out on to lightly floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic, adding additional flour as needed. (This is a soft dough). Place in well greased bowl and roll dough over to grease the top. Cover with a damp cloth and let rise in warm place until double in size, about one hour.

Punch dough down and turn out on lightly floured surface. Divide dough in half.
To fill, roll out each piece of dough into 9×18 inch rectangle. Brush each rectangle generously with melted margarine. Combine the 1 ¼ cups sugar and cinnamon. Sprinkle an equal portion on each rectangle. Roll dough up like a jelly roll, starting from the long side. Cut into 2 inch slices. Place remaining melted margarine in bottom of 16 ½ x 11 ½ x 2 ½ inch. Arrange slices in pan and cover loosely with greased wax paper. Let rise in pan until doubled in size, about 45 to 60 minutes.

Bake at 350F for 35 to 45 minuets. Remove from oven and immediately invert onto severing tray. Makes 18 large cinnamon buns.

NOW FROM THE UBC ALUMNI SITE
www.alumni.ubc.ca/about/faq.php downloaded 2009-11-22

How do you make the UBC cinnamon buns?
UBC students have been hoovering up these sticky treats for more than 50 years. Introduced in 1954 by a Hungarian baker named Grace Hasz, the bake shop produces 100 dozen buns daily. In recent years, Food Services has produced a miniature version of the cinnamon bun, responding to our modern belief that rich, delicious foods are bad for us. The traditional recipe calls for margarine rather than butter. But why? Probably because the original recipe was concocted post WWII when butter was hard to come by.

Dough
3 cups (750 mL) 2% milk
6 tablespoons (90 mL) butter
6 tablespoons (90 mL) granulated sugar
1 tablespoon (15 mL) salt
1 teaspoon (5 mL) sugar
1/2 cup (125 mL) warm water
2 (8 g) packages active dry yeast
2 large eggs
9 cups (2.25 L) all-purpose flour, about

Filling
11/4 cups (300 mL) sugar
2 tablespoons (30 mL) ground cinnamon
3/4 cup (175 mL) melted butter, divided

Dough: Scald milk. Stir in butter, 6 tablespoons (90 mL) sugar and salt. Cool to lukewarm. Dissolve the 1 teaspoon (5 mL) sugar in lukewarm water. Sprinkle yeast over water mixture. Let stand in warm place for 10 minutes; stir. In large bowl, combine lukewarm milk mixture and eggs. Stir in dissolved yeast. Add 4 to 5 cups (1 to 1.25 L) flour and beat well for 10 minutes. With wooden spoon, gradually add enough of the remaining flour to make a soft dough. Turn dough out on to lightly floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic, adding additional flour as needed. (This is a soft dough.) Place in well greased bowl and roll dough over to grease the top. Cover with a damp cloth and let rise in warm place for 1 hour or until double in size.

Meanwhile prepare filling: In small bowl, combine sugar and cinnamon; set aside.

Punch down dough and turn out on to lightly floured surface. Divide dough in half. Roll out each piece of dough into 18×9-inch (46×23 cm) rectangle. Brush each rectangle generously with melted butter. Place remaining melted butter in bottom of 161/2 x111/2 x21/2-inch (42x29x6 cm) pan. Sprinkle an equal portion of sugar-cinnamon mixture evenly over each rectangle. Roll each dough rectangle up tightly like a jelly roll, starting from the long side; pinch seam to seal. With sharp knife, cut into 2-inch (5 cm) slices. Arrange slices, cut-side down, in prepared pan and cover loosely with greased wax paper. Let rise in warm place for 45 to 60 minutes or until doubled in size.

Bake at 350 F (180 C) for 35 to 45 minutes or until baked. Remove from oven and immediately invert on to serving tray.

Makes 18 large cinnamon buns.

Approximate nutritional analysis for each serving: 433 cal, 9 g pro, 14 g fat, 69 g carb.

The info below is from …. www.100.ubc.ca/celebratingpeople/staff/cunningham.html

When I originally asked who was the master of the famous UBC cinnamon bun, both Andrew Parr,
head of UBC Food Services, and Executive Chef Piyush Sahay said without hesitation, "Peter Cunningham."
Peter has worked at Totem Park Dining Hall since 1974. For 20 years he’s worked the midnight shift as the pastry chef. It made me wonder how many cinnamon buns one person could bake over that time period. I don’t need to wonder anymore because as soon as I arrived Peter said that he and Piyush had calculated that he had baked over seven million buns. That’s impressive. So I asked him the greatest number of buns he’s baked in a single night. 150 dozen which my calculator tells me is 1,800 buns. I have finally met the person who can open the vault on making great cinnamon buns.

I had originally intended to capture my interview with Peter on video. But my digital ineptitude, combined with Peter’s put an end to that idea. In truth I wish I had, because words don’t adequately capture his animation when he described how the dough is just right,when the texture isn’t too firm or too soft, how you have to add a little of this and a little of that so that it’s just so, that only experience can tell you when it’s perfect and how hard it is to remove all the dough that ends up all over you after a night of heavy baking.

I asked him if anyone could make a great bun. "Anyone can make a bun," he said, "but it takes experience to make a great bun." Both Peter and Piyush agreed that the seasoned cinnamon bun connoisseur knows when there is the slightest change in the recipe or technique, and they definitely hear about it.

When I asked Peter what had changed over the years, he said volume. Health concerns have decreased demand and also prompted the removal of trans fats from the recipe. Other than that, the recipe is exactly the same as the one created by Grace Hasz in 1954.

A beautiful sleek oven with cinnamon twists baking inside is the new energy efficient computerized combi-oven that recently replaced the six-rack rotary oven that "took up the space of a small room," Piyush said.

The only other concession to time is that the mini cinnamon buns are affectionately referred to as ”nanos.” Although not available daily, they can be ordered through Catering, Central Kitchen or the retail outlets.

Now that’s a beautiful marriage between tradition and modernity.

cakeonthebrain.blogspot.com/2008/04/cinnamon-bun-styles-t…

I have a 15 year old Black and Decker bread machine stashed away in my cupboard.

You didn’t know Black and Decker made bread machines, didja? (no, I didn’t buy it at Home Depot!) I have gotten some good use out of my machine and it’s still chugging along no problems…knock-on-wood! Though it’s an ugly beast it does the job. It doesn’t have a little glass window so you can watch the bread mix, rise and bake. I just lift the lid and take a peek. What I discovered is that it’s perfect for making really wet and sticky doughs. I just use the "dough" setting and when it’s ready I do the rest by hand. I’ve made foccaccia, brioche and of course cinnamon buns with this great dough setting.

I was flipping through my collection of cinnamon bun recipes and I came across a couple of favourites…

In Vancouver, we have an institution that makes the best Cinnamon Buns ever. They’re unique and you have to be a starving university student to understand the cult-like following that these buns have. In fact, you have to be on campus to purchase these buns. The University of British Columbia has the best caramelized cinnamon buns out there. There’s no stupid raisins sticking out of the dough. There’s no nuts and there’s no cream cheese frosting. The texture is lighter and they’re not as rich as the ones you buy at the mall. But these suckers are HUGE. Each bun is about 3 inches tall and the size of a side plate. The centres are of course the best with all their sticky gooeyness.

When I was attending UBC, I’d buy one and it would sustain me the whole day. Not a very balanced diet, but this wasn’t what I did every day. I acquired the UBC Cinnamon Bun recipe from the local newspaper, The Vancouver Sun, and made them many times. The last time I made it, as I was pulling the roasting pan out of the oven, (yes, they’re so huge you need a roasting pan for them) the pan touched my inner forearm and I had the nastiest burn ever. I haven’t really made them since.

However, if you’re a daredevil and think you could eat the whole batch, I’ll include the recipe for UBC Cinnamon buns in this post. It’s a traditional recipe, made by hand, and yields enough buns to feed a small country or your kids’ soccer team. Just scroll to the bottom.

The next best thing to UBC Cinnamon buns are those that you get slathered with cream cheese frosting. There are different chains producing them in the food courts in malls and some bakeries and coffee shops carry them too.

I have a quick and easy Bread Machine Cream Cheese Frosting slathered Sin-Amen (hey, I coined an oxymoron!) Bun recipe.

The dough is all mixed in your Bread Machine according to manufacturer’s instructions…on just the dough cycle. You take out the dough, roll it out and fill it and then roll it up like a jellyroll. You don’t even have to wait for a second rise. You just pop it in the hot oven and by the time you finish creaming together the frosting, the buns are ready!

So you can choose your cinnamon bun style today: traditional (i.e. time-consuming), light and caramelized or quick (i.e. bread machine), dense, gooey, creamy and rich

SIN-AMEN ROLLS WITH CREAM CHEESE FROSTING
(BREAD MACHINE METHOD)

DOUGH:
1 T (1 pkg) dry yeast
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 t salt
4 cups all purpose flour
1 cup milk
2 large eggs
1/3 cup unsalted butter, cut up into 1 cm cubes

FILLING:
1 cup packed golden sugar
2 1/2 T cinnamon
1/3 cup unsalted butter, melted
ICING:
8 T unsalted butter, softened
1/2 cups powdered sugar
1/4 cup cream cheese, at room temperature
1/2 t vanilla
1/8 t salt

PREHEAT the oven to 400 degreesF

DOUGH: following the manufacturer’s instructions, dump all the dough ingredients into the bread machine in the correct order. Press the dough setting.

While the dough is being processed in the machine, prepare the Filling and the Icing.

FILLING: mix the golden brown sugar and cinnamon well.

When the dough cycle is complete, roll out the dough to approximately 21 inches by 16 inches. [cakebrain’s secret tip: I do all of my rolling on a plastic wrap-lined counter. I sandwich the dough between two layers of plastic wrap and roll with a rolling pin until I get my desired measurements. Yes, it’s unorthodox, but I don’t make a mess, it isn’t sticky, I don’t use additional flour and it’s a breeze to clean up! Scoff if you must, you professional pastry chefs, but I’m not wasting time cleaning up afterwards!]

Using a pastry brush, brush the melted butter evenly on the rolled out dough. [don’t forget to peel off the top layer of plastic wrap before you do this!]

Sprinkle the sugar & cinnamon mixture evenly over the dough.

Roll it up jelly-roll style, starting at the long edge. [cakebrain tip#2: If you were following my tip about the plastic wrap, you’d be doing this step easily. Just pick up one long edge of the plastic wrap underneath, and use it to lift the dough and roll it. I also gently press on the roll to make sure it’s not too loose. When you get to the end, just use the plastic wrap to help you move the roll around. You don’t have to actually touch the dough…it’s super sticky. Of course, when you’re all done, discard the plastic wrap.]

Using a serrated bread knife, and a sawing action, cut the dough equally in half. Then cut each half equally in half again. You should have 4 equally long pieces. Cut each of these into 3 equal lengths. You will have a total of 12 cinnamon buns.

Place the buns cut side down an equal distance apart in a buttered baking pan

Bake for 12-15 minutes or until light golden brown.

FROSTING: cream the softened butter and cream cheese until smooth. Mix in confectioners’ sugar, vanilla and salt until well combined. Frost the cinnamon buns with the frosting after they’ve cooled. [I usually frost half of the buns because some people don’t like frosting or like to control how much they have. I just keep the rest of the frosting in a bowl for them to serve themselves]

these freeze well!

*************

Now, what some of you UBC alumni may have been looking for high and low. These are the legendary, gargantuan

UBC CINNAMON BUNS

(as published in the Vancouver Sun)

DOUGH
3 cups (750mL) milk (2%M.F.)
6 T (90 mL) butter
6 T (90 mL) granulated sugar
1 T (15 mL) salt
1 t (5 mL) granulated sugar
1/2 cup (125 mL) lukewarm water
2 (8 g) packages traditional active dry yeast
2 large eggs
9 cups (2.25 L) all-purpose flour, about
FILLING
1 1/4 cups (300 mL) granulated sugar
2 T (30 mL) ground cinnamon
3/4 cup (175mL) melted butter, divided

For the dough: scald milk. Stir in butter, 6 T sugar and salt. Cool to lukewarm
Dissolve the 1 t sugar in lukewarm water. Sprinkle yeast over water mixture. Let stand in warm place for 10 minutes; stir
In large bowl, combine lukewarm milk mixture and eggs. Stir in dissolved yeast. Add 4 to 5 cups flour and beat well for 10 minutes. With wooden spoon, gradually add enough of the remaining flour to make a soft dough.
Turn dough out on to lightly floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic, adding additional flour as needed. (This is a soft dough). Place in well greased bowl and roll dough over to grease the top. Cover with a damp cloth and let rise in warm place for 1 hour or until double in size.
Meanwhile, prepare filling: In small bowl, combine sugar and cinnamon; set aside
Punch down dough and turn out on to lightly floured surface. Divide the dough in half
Roll out each piece of dough into 18 x 9 inch (46x23cm) rectangle Brush each rectangle generously with melted butter. Place remaining melted butter in bottom of a large 16.5×11.5×2.5inch roasting pan (42x29x6cm)
Sprinkle an equal portion of sugar-cinnamon mixture evenly over each rectangle. Roll each dough rectangle up tightly like a jelly roll, starting from the long side; pinch seam to seal. With sharp knife, cut into 2inch (5cm) slices. Arrange slices, cut-side down, in prepared pan and cover loosely with greased wax paper. Let rise in warm place for 45 to 60 minutes or until double in size.
Bake at 350degreesF (180C) for 35-45 minutes or until baked
Remove from oven and immediately invert on to serving tray.
Makes 18 large cinnamon buns
approx. nutritional analysis for each serving: 433 cal, 9 g pro, 14 g fat, 69 g carb

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