Successful Dieting While Eating Foods With a Low Glycemic Index

Foods with a low Glycemic Index can avoid volatility within your blood sucrose levels. There are multifaceted benefits of this phenomenon. The (GI) measures a given food’s proclivity to cause sharp spikes in blood sugar levels. Foods high on the GI table can cause rapid blood glucose increases. Foods with a low rating allow for a more gradual rise and subsequent slow decline back down.

Diabetics have always known to avoid sharp deviations in blood sugar levels. Research has shown that all of us would benefit from paying attention to this metric. When one consumes a diet rich in high GI foods, then the inevitable drop in blood glucose levels cause the dreaded “sugar crash”.

This crash both zaps energy along with causing the body to feel hunger again. Therefore, adherence to a low GI chart diet imparts both increased energy along with extra will power to avoid mid-day or late night snacks. The good news is that a plan which sticks to foods low on the chart does not have to equate to eating like a rabbit.

The glycemic index chart ranges from 1 to 100. At the peak of the chart is pure sugar scoring at 100. Foods which score above 70 are considered high. Foods scoring under 55 are deemed to be low and thus desired. Foods between 55 and 70 are mid-range and can be consumed in moderation without triggering adverse blood glucose effects.

Within each category of foods there are choices which are high on the chart along with choices which are low on the chart. An example would be rice. Glutinous sticky rice has an extremely high score of 98 whereas Basmati Rice scores a moderate 58. High amylose rice tends to score lower compared to other forms of rice.

The vast majority of vegetables score very low with a salient exception being broad beans. When it comes to snacks, peanuts score very low on the GI chart versus pretzels which come in with a score of 81. When it comes to bread, a portion of whole grain bread is a moderate 48 on the chart versus a baguette which is a sky high 95. Most fruits are low to moderate on the table with the glaring exceptions of watermelon and pineapple.

Although it may appear to be confusing at first, the glycemic index table is easily comprehended. While it is not always possible to stick solely with foods that are low on the index, it is possible to attenuate the blood sugar level fluctuations by combining a high GI food with a high protein food. For example, a slice of bacon along with the aforementioned baguette serves to dampen the adverse effects that would be felt should the baguette have been eaten on its own.

Obviously, the GI is just one facet of a diet. A healthy and well rounded diet takes into consideration a multiplicity of factors many of which are based upon common sense. Additionally, any dieting plan must include a regimen of regular exercise. Also, a person should always consult with a physician before starting any dieting plan, one who will be able to further explain the various benefits of foods with a low glycemic index values.

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